Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
December 19, 2010
Image Size
1.0 MB
Resolution
2480×3508
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
11,291 (6 today)
Favourites
258 (who?)
Comments
15
Downloads
296
×
ARCHER by unsmoking-Cigarette ARCHER by unsmoking-Cigarette
VALUE STUDY
Add a Comment:
 
:iconcapnnomn:

Wow Hello There! ;)


Hi. You're amazing! If you could take a quick second to answer this, you would honestly change my life: What do I physically need to do during practice, each day, to eventually be able to create art like you? How did you learn and become so amazing?!!


Can you please break down exactly what one extremely motivated beginner student would need to do, each & every day when he or she sits down to practice, in order to create these incredible photorealistic 2d digital drawing/paintings?


People just say 'Practice.' But I do not know 'exactly' what this entails. 


Can you maybe make me, like, a list or something?!! So I can then go out and explore those topics? Or at least tell me what I need to physically be doing with my practice time so I can get as good as you? 


If there's any books/DVDs/tutorials you can recommend that totally helped you get better, that would be so freakin' incredible!!!


Thanks for the help!

Reply
:iconunsmoking-cigarette:
It's a pleasure of mine when you ask me such question.

Everything is just about the fundamental. 
"A bad drawing with a good color is just still a bad artwork, and a good drawing with ad color is still a good work."
Here it means that you need the good core to make a good result, like a rare and exquisite crystal will make a valuable and powerful lightsaber.

You need to learn first before practice. You have talent, but you need to learn to do what you want. Like you like to learn swordmanship but how can you learn when you don't know what a sword looks like?
Knowledge here in art is about tonal value, perspective, composition (which contains a lot of things inside it,) etc and then you need the thought of your own to bring the soul into your works. 

But don't be mistaken. KNowledge is just knowledge, it's not helping you to success. Don't spend too much time reading book or joining workshop without bothering to create art. Apply what your learn into your works. 

Let's imagine you go to the seashore and see an object lay on the beach. 
You come close and yell at it. Nothing happens. You use a stick and poke it. Nothing happens. Then finally you sharpen the stick and penetrate it. Nothing happens. Which you can conclude that this object does not contain any sign of intelligence. 

SAME with practice. You gotta work hard, but you need to improve everyday. Every time you work, you need to ask yourself why you work, ask yourself about the goal you want to achieve and aim for that goal. 
Practice is not to get something done everyday. Getting something done everyday without thinking about it is called "Activity." And as an artist, you need to avoid this. 

Try your best every time you lay your pen down on the paper. Think about what makes your previous one look bad, and fix it. Think about what makes your previous work look good, and improve it. Self-criticize yourself. Aim for one goal only. Don't change your focus. 

Don't wait for inspiration. You have to get your ass down and work until your inspiration come to you from your own progress. 

Appreciate every page of the sketchbook because every page is an artwork. Aint matter it's bad or good. It's yours. So appreciate it. 

Finish your work. Finish it. 

Don't isolate yourself. Learn from everyone. 

And knowing that success never comes quickly.

I look over your site and can tell that you like doing graphite. So check out these books if you have enough budget:

"Rendering in pencil" by Arthur L. Guptill. (about 20 bucks for latest version)
"Rendering in pen and ink" by Arthur L. Guptill (about 20 bucks for latest version)
"Creative illustration" by Andrew Loomis (about 30~35 bucks)
"Drawing manual" by Glen Vilppu (most important!!!! about 40 bucks)
"Imaginative Realism" by James Gurney

for color, after you already improve your draftsmanship.

"Alla Prima" by Richard Schmidt (get a PDF if you can, because it's a limited edition printed by the artist himself which cost you thousand bucks.)

or "Alla Prima 2" also by him.

"Color and Light" by James Gurney. 


For reference, that depends much on your taste. When you improve, you learn that I'm not good at all. :)
My favorite artists are: Iain McCaig, John Howe, Craig Mullins, Alan Lee, Richard Anderson, Daniel Dociu, Theo Prins. 

Reply
:iconcapnnomn:
Hey man, thank you so much for taking the time to respond to me. That was very thoughtful. 
+Karma to you sir!!

I am going through every word you said, and I hope to pass my [our?] skills on someday, like you did for me. 
Reply
:iconunsmoking-cigarette:
you're welcome. 

I just pass on what my teachers taught me :) 

Hope that help
Reply
:iconnelkoblacksun:
NelkoBlacksun Oct 28, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Amazing.
Reply
:icongraceofgod724:
Graceofgod724 Mar 23, 2013  Student Writer
i liked this image so much that used it with the heading of the first chapter in my story...if you don't want that you can tell me and ill take it down.
Reply
:iconunsmoking-cigarette:
Feel free to do so. I'm happy to hear that :) Thanks for your appreciation.
Reply
:iconsenselessdoom71:
that kick's ass
Reply
:iconthephilosopheredward:
ThePhilosopherEdward Jun 7, 2011  Professional Writer
Wow, just found this. Nice!
Reply
Add a Comment: